Risking death to eat out isn’t ‘resistance,’ it’s recklessness


A server sits in a booth with diners at the Silver Dollar Saloon in Marysville, Calif., on May 5. <span class="copyright">(Los Angeles Times)</span>
A server sits in a booth with diners at the Silver Dollar Saloon in Marysville, Calif., on May 5. (Los Angeles Times)

To the editor: As many restaurants are anxious to reopen, the Silver Dollar Saloon in Yuba County, which opened in defiance of state orders, shows exactly how it should not be done. (“2 counties defied Newsom and reopened. Now California warns restaurants could lose licenses if opened too early,” May 7)

Pictured mingling with customers shoulder to shoulder and with sneakers propped up on the opposite bench, apparently the waitress is not aware of how the coronavirus is spread.

I can imagine responsible business owners looking at the front-page photo, cringing and thinking, “This won’t help us open up.”

Tony Baker, Rancho Palos Verdes

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To the editor: “Resistance” is a word that usually describes action taken against tyranny, not against rules that are made the save people’s lives. Is it really worth risking death for a tortilla or a beer? (“An Orange County cafe opened in defiance of Newsom. Now it’s the center of stay-at-home resistance,” May 8)

I guess calls by President Trump, former New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie and so many other Republicans for people to be willing to risk their lives to bring back the economy resonate with some very hungry and very thirsty people.

They may be willing to die, but most of us would rather live and not have the virus spread.

Susan Harris, Glendale

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To the editor: Seeing the picture of people standing close together without masks at a San Clemente restaurant, I was reminded of what Heraclitus, the pre-Socratic thinker, wrote: “Stupidity is better kept a secret than displayed.”

Rod Hagenbuch, Pacific Palisades



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